Foreign students’ rental experiences

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Moving to Ireland was a dream come true for most of us, and it was an adventure, to say the least as a foreign student. There are numerous processes involved in relocating to another country, and among the most important, if not the most important, is locating a place to live. When planning to relocate to another place, some of the first things we look for are the weather, the crime rate, the housing conditions, the transit system, and the degree of racism (for me). There are just a few ideas that came to mind. There are other items to consider and keep an eye out for, but the rental scheme in Ireland is the main priority today.

I can tell you without a doubt, based on my own knowledge and the experiences of friends, that finding a place to live in Ireland is a hassle in and of itself. Foreign students, in particular, face a significant challenge.

Photo by SevenStorm JUHASZIMRUS from Pexels

First and foremost, there is the absurd requisite documentation that you must provide before they can even accept you. Bank statements, references, including landlord references – where do I get a landlord reference if this is my first time in this country? When you say that you are visiting the country for the first time, they might be more lenient with you; it all depends on the case.

Then there’s the work reference, the address proof, and so on. These are typically the standard necessary papers, although they can vary depending on the landlord or agency. The most disappointing thing is that if you do not get the apartment/room/house after having all of this paperwork, it can feel like a punch to the face. Particularly after so many sleepless nights spent looking for a place to live.

Don’t get me wrong, you could get lucky and get a spot without too much trouble, but the odds are slim. The prices are the next factor to remember. This should be the first thing you think of when you need to find a place that suits your budget. And because everybody enjoys their luxury, you can budget about €500 for a very nice room, which is certainly excluding the bills. The bills may be prepaid or bi-monthly, meaning you’ll have plenty to look forward to. There are other affordable alternatives, such as renting a room for €300 or €350, but you’ll have to share with more than 5 people to get it that low. Don’t forget you have to pay a one- or two-month deposit.

Few videos on their various rental experiences and advice;


Here’s a checklist of what I usually do when searching for a place to rent:

Fortunately, there are a plethora of apps and websites to choose from and decide what works best for you. Daft, Facebook Market place, Spotahome, and others are among them.

• Be aware of the financial situation.

• Know where you want to live and where you want to go because distance matters a lot! To check the distance, I still use Google Maps.

• What kind of property are you looking for: a shared room, a private room, a whole apartment, a whole house, etc.

• Prepare the records (references, proof of address, etc.).

• Create a sample message to send if you come across a listing that you want. Include all of the reasons that you will be a decent roommate and a good revenue generator, for example.

• Send your application to as many listings as possible. There is no such thing as a small sum since they can either not react or respond negatively.

• Continue to submit!!!!

• Wish for a positive response.

My recommendation is that you start looking before you move. Pay nothing until you’ve seen the house and hope for the best.

I’m sure we all have different rental property stories, and I’d love to hear about yours. Leave a comment below on your experience or any suggestions you have for foreign students considering a move to Ireland.

Credit: Gurmeet Haryana


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