Far from Home in a Pandemic

Photo Credit: Edward Jenner from Pexel.com

In a report, by BBC, loneliness has a negative effect on the mind that leads to mental health problems from depression, anxiety, stress, and lack of confidence.

With the corona outbreak, many countries have been forced to go on complete lockdown and social distancing. Although in countries like Ireland and U.K, essential services are still available, there are still restrictions on movement.

The question remains, how long will the lockdown last? And how is the lockdown affecting those living alone in foreign countries? There is growing evidence that social isolation is connected with an increased risk of physical ill health as well.

As an international student, at the onset of the outbreak, I panicked and was ready to go back home. Thanks to the reassurance by the school communication team, I stayed. However, they are others out there who felt the same way. Immigrants and international students, especially those staying alone, find this time very difficult.

According to Lindi Masinga, a student at Griffith college from South Africa, she had to stop reading the news because it causes her anxiety. She said that she wishes she was back home with her family.

Another student, Joke Ajayi from Nigeria, said that she has never felt so alone in her life. She is scared of experiencing the Home Alone Syndrome and prays that this all comes to an end real soon.

Staying far alone in a pandemic is not easy, but we all have to pull together and try to keep a social distance. To avoid feeling alone, everyone must stay in touch with friends and family via phone calls.

In the video below, I interviewed Lindi Masinga and Rupali Ovali to hear how they are coping, far from their families.