Wonderful Wicklow Walks

Sadbh Maguire

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A short cry from the hustle and bustle of Dublin, you can find yourself breathing in the fresh clean air of Co. Wicklow.

Lough Tay, Wicklow, Photo Credit Giuseppe Milo
Lough Tay, Wicklow, Photo Credit Giuseppe Milo

Many people head straight for Glendalough which is a wonderful place, but it gets very crowded. If you were to go there on a bank holiday Monday in October, you’ll find almost as many people as you would Christmas Eve on Grafton street.

But there is a lot more to Wicklow than just Glendalough, beautiful and all as it is. Wicklow has one of the biggest National parks in Ireland and it is less than an hour’s drive from the Spire in O’Connell Street. Wicklow’s National park covers 20,000 hectares and is mostly bog, mountain and heath. Here you can find many beautiful walking trails and lakes. Wicklow is also covered in forests and Coillte, the national forestry agency, makes these forests very accessible to people through developing walks and bike trails. One such forest is Ballinastoe Woods on the road between Enniskerry and Roundwood. These woods have many kilometres of path ways that are great for walking. The uppermost walking trail brings you out to a beautiful view above Lough Tay and the former Guinness estate at Luggala. This forest also has a  16 kilometre systems of bike trail.

Greystones to Bray Cliff Walk, Photo Credit, Giuseppe Milo
Greystones to Bray Cliff Walk, Photo Credit, Giuseppe Milo

Accessible from the same road is a really nice walk of about 3 hours which takes in great views of Powerscourt Waterfall valley and fantastic views of the Wicklow mountains from the top of Maulin.

Powerscourt Waterfall walk, Photo Credit Sean MacEntee
Powerscourt Waterfall walk, Photo Credit Sean MacEntee

If you don’t have access to a car you can have a lovely train journey along the coast as far as Greystones flowed by a 2 hour cliff walk from Greystones back to Bray.

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Sadbh Maguire

  • John Sweeney

    Great to get some alternative suggestions so close to Dublin. It’s a good enough topic that it might be revisited at some future date with additional detail, e.g. how long to allow for the walk, whether it is for beginners or experienced hill walkers etc. It certainly whets the appetite to explore some of these places. Well done.