The Story of St Patrick’s Day

PIXABAY: BarbaraALane & AnnCarter

 

Happy St. Patricks Day everyone.

2020 is a very unusual Paddies Day considering the parades are cancelled, pubs are shut and for the first time ever, there is no mass. (Or at least an in-person Ceremony)

On the topic of pubs, the idea of celebrating the festival in the local-only started in the ’60s after the sale of an alcohol ban on St. Patricks day was lifted since its inception in 1927.

To celebrate the festival, I’ve created a short podcast looking at who St. Patrick was, how we celebrate the feast and I visit St. Patricks Cathedral Dublin to learn a little more about the day and person.

C Lance Kerrigan 2020

You can learn more about St. Patricks Cathedral Dublin and donate to the refurbishment of the roof, from their website https://www.stpatrickscathedral.ie/support-us/ 

 

Having taken a strolled through the city centre yesterday, I couldn’t help notice the sheer lack of preparations for the O’Connell Street parade and the crowds of tourists flooding the city with green. There is an eerie silence about the place… a calm before the storm, but certainly, not the typical eve to Irelands biggest annual festival, as streets which are normally clogged with drinkers are abandoned and establishments shut.

Below are some shots of Rush hour Dublin on March 16th the eve of St. Patrick’s Day which should be one of Dublin’s busiest times of the year.

 

Temple Bar 17:45 March 16 – C LK 2020

TempleBar Square at Rush hour. Almost completed deserted on the evening when it would normally be packed with tourists, entertainment and stalls. Demonstrating the effect COVID-19 and Pub closures are having on footfall.

 

O’Connell Street 17:30 March 16 – C LK 2020

O’Connell Street. On March 16th any other year this area would prepare for the country’s biggest day o the year. Instead, there is an absence of street barriers and seating/stage area and looks like off-peak time.

 

Grafton Street Deserted March 16th 18:00 – C LK 2020

Grafton Street looks almost deserted during Monday evening Rush hour on the eve of St. Patricks Day. Under normal conditions this part of the street would be ‘jammers’ with Street performers and crowds of people; commuters clashing with tourists. Instead a handful of people making their way home

About Lance Kerrigan 7 Articles
My name is Lance, and I am a student of Journalism at Griffith College Dublin. What got me into journalism was a long road of trail and error and finally realising a passion for telling stories. I like to be in the know swell as sharing this knowledge with the world while also adding my 'balanced' opinion on the matter. My Interests include writing, photography and videography. Haven spent the last 7 years in Digital Media I believe journalism is the next step.