So this week, as per usual, I pottered out of college and stood at the side of the road waving my left arm around for a taxi. I usually never have to wait more than 60 seconds for a taxi. But this time, it felt like every taxi saw me and turned off their light! Eventually a taxi pulled up – to my rescue as the taxi man put it.

Dublin Taxi - Photo Credit - Tony Webster

Dublin Taxi – Photo Credit – Tony Webster – Flickr

He said he was meant to be meeting his friend, who was also doing an evening course at Griffith College. But thankfully, he saw a lady in need of a taxi and was committed to his job (his friend didn’t answer when he rang him).

So the customary small talk began…. “I was meant to meet a friend at Griffith”. He explained that he used to work with this guy. So politely (being nosey) – I asked what they work or used to work as. He said his claim to fame was helping bring the Euro to Ireland. Mr. Taxi man and his friend were both very high up in this high-end company. (Which I can’t remember the name of, so don’t be afraid to fill me in, anyone?)

So then I explained what I was up to, and how I wanted to become a very successful journalist, but mainly I hope that someday I would be rich and make millions (earning over 10 euro an hour would be a good start).

After my mad for money speech was over, Mr. Taxi man began his money speech. He said he didn’t quit his job, he was “pushed aside” in 2008 like many people in Ireland. Before he lost his job he had a demanding role within the company. He said he was out of the country regularly and although he was thankful for the experience of seeing the world; he felt he missed out on his own life because of his work.

His family incudes his wife and he has kids. After he lost his job he took some time off to get himself together and as embarrassed as he was to admit it, it took some time to bond with his kids again. He said losing his job was the best thing that ever happened to him! He didn’t realise how disconnected he had become with his wife and his family.

He said his wages had since been halved; but life had never been better. He said some people laughed when he told them he was going to drive a taxi for a living – but he knew it felt right. He laughed to himself and said it was all in the past now.

As we approached the bus station he said, I hope you heard all that? I laughed and said of course I did, he wished me good luck with college and told me that being rich and having money wasn’t everything.

Money Quote - Photo Credit - Celestine Chua - Flickr

Money Quote – Photo Credit – Celestine Chua – Flickr

Coincidently, on my bus on the way home, a man was sat in front of me. He was on his phone talking rubbish, to my knowledge. I thought he had lost the plot and I was just unlucky enough to have sat behind him. After more time listening (being nosey) I realised he was reading a bed time story to his child/children through the phone. Maybe it was a sign……