Solar Eclipse at Trinity College Dublin March 2015

Eleanor Mannion

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For work, this morning, I had the opportunity to go along to Solar Eclipse 15 at Trinity College Dublin. First things first – proper safety-wear was required.

Solar Safety Glasses - Photo credit: Eleanor Mannion
Solar Safety Glasses – Photo credit: Eleanor Mannion

Even though the sky was blanketed and  full of white and grey clouds for most of the morning, a crowd of well over a thousand gathered and remained in good form.

 

Crowd Gathers at Trinity College Dublin - Photo Credit: Eleanor Mannion
Crowd Gathers at Trinity College Dublin – Photo Credit: Eleanor Mannion
Spectator at SolarEclipse15 in TCD - Photo Credit: Eleanor Mannion
Spectator at SolarEclipse15 in TCD – Photo Credit: Eleanor Mannion

There were plenty of experts walking the ground happy to answer any questions the public might have on this rare celestial occurrence – “No the world is not ending!!”. One expert I chatted to was Professor Shane Bergin – he was full of knowledge and enthusiasm for his field of work.

Professor Shane Bergin of Dart of Physics - Photo Credit: Eleanor Mannion
Professor Shane Bergin of Dart of Physics – Photo Credit: Eleanor Mannion

If this recent solar eclipse has renewed or ignited an interest in the area of science you should check out Dart of Physics website for exciting upcoming events throughout Dublin later this year.

Dart of Physics Badge - Photo Credit: Eleanor Mannion

Dart of Physics Badge – Photo Credit: Eleanor Mannion

TCD Astrophysicist Dr Joseph Roche demonstrates to RTÉ’s Science and Technology Correspondent Will Goodbody how the eclipse happens.

Dr Joseph Roche demonstrates how the solar eclipse happens - Photo Credit: Eleanor Mannion
Dr Joseph Roche demonstrates how the solar eclipse happens – Photo Credit: Eleanor Mannion

Also available to the viewing public were TCD Department of Physics’ powerful telescopes.

One of TCD's Dept of Physics telescopes available to the public - Photo Credit: Eleanor Mannion
One of TCD’s Dept of Physics telescopes available to the public – Photo Credit: Eleanor Mannion

When it all seemed to be over and the grey dense cloud showed no sign of being burnt off by the sun; it happened! Yes it was only 10 seconds worth of a glimpse of the partial solar eclipse, at approx 9.15am, but it was the perfect reward to all those who had gathered since 7am that morning. If you want to hear what that sounded like check out my radio report here.

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Eleanor Mannion