Sex for grades in Nigeria

Photo by Magda Ehlers from Pexels
Photo by Kat Jayne from Pexels

 

Sexual harassment on campuses in Nigeria has gone on for decades unchecked. This issue became more prominent ever since the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) carried out a documentary captioned sex for Grades:Undercover inside Nigerian and Ghanaian Universities. The documentary was released on the 7th of October 2019 andcontains a combination of first-hand accounts from students with personal stories relating to various lecturers and undercover journalists posing as students to see how the lecturers act around them. This documentary featured Kiki Mordi who is a Nigerian journalist and a media personality, she is currently a BBC Eye Reporter, she played an undercover student who was seeking to gain admission in the University. After the death of her father, she gained admission into University of Nigeria Nsukka to study medicine, but later dropped out due to sexual harassment from a certain lecturer, she said in an interview she said: “I’m a 28-year-old who never got to finish school because of one thing, It wasn’t because I wasn’t brilliant or anything — I was a high flyer when I was growing up. But I didn’t even finish. All because of sexual harassment.”

I overheard my colleague in class talking about how the educational institute in Nigeria is great, I could only but smile because most student like myself who could only afford a Federal University education will say otherwise. Let’s not start with the little or no facilities but about lecturers who threatens female student and purposely making a student repeat a course because she fails to accept his sex advances. My educational experience was a survival of the fittest. I did a podcast on this issue and interviewed a current lecturer in a university in Nigeria and also a media personality Prince Isaac.

 

 

Music by Leona Lewis-Bleeding Love

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