Not asking questions at the end of the interview makes it look as though you’re after ‘just a job’ as opposed to wanting ‘the right one’. You don’t want to seem like a desperate person that doesn’t really care about the company, do you? Asking questions that show you’ve done some research tells the potential employer that you’re taking the company seriously. Also, think through what you need to know if this job was offered to you RIGHT NOW. Here are 22 questions you should consider asking during your job interview:

1. What was it about my application that interested you enough to invite me to an interview?

2. Why is the position open? (Note: The answer will result in more information about how things work in the company, and can prepare you for the famous “where do you see yourself in five years” question, as it gives you a feel for what would be realistic for yourself if you were to take the job.)

3. What are some character traits that you feel are important to succeed in this role?

4. What are the daily expectations of the job?

5. How does an average day look like for a person in this particular position?

6. What changes would you like to see from the next person to fill this role?

7. If I were to step into this role tomorrow, what would be my top priority?

8. Is there any reason you can think of that I wouldn’t be a good fit for this position?

9. What are some of the ‘less desirable’ characteristics of this position?

10. How are the advancement opportunities within the company?

11. How often would I be asked to work more than 40 hours per week, or work on weekends?

12. What projects are you going to work on next? (Note: This shows that you’re eager to get started.)

13. What is the turnover rate here? (Note: This is the ratio of the number of workers that had to be replaced in a given time period to the average number of workers.)

14. How long have you been with the company, and how did you start working here? (Note: This usually makes the interviewer tell their whole history. People usually love talking about themselves and if you show an interest in them, they will want you around. Don’t fear this question – The interviewer will NOT get an impression that you’re just sucking up. On the contrary, this is getting people on your side.)

15. Do you like working here? (Note: This question is less about the answer and more about how they answer it. One of the top answers you should be looking for is “the people”. Establishing an idea of the corporate culture is very important.)

16. What’s the culture like here? (Note: This shows that you want to fit in. Employers are fully aware that we spend much of our lives at work, and that’s why they like it when job seekers want to make sure they’ll be happy at work.)

17. Who am I going to work with on a daily basis?

18. What is the average age of my team?

19. How long has the team been together?

20. How much time, on average, would you say the team spends in meetings per week?

21. How well do employees get along with one another?

22. Give your potential employer a brief run-down of the position and what you think you’ll be doing at the company. Ask: If this run-down is inaccurate, can you please fill in any blanks?

Keep in mind that asking the questions above must be a product of your sincere interest in the company. Otherwise, you’ll seem unnatural and you won’t get hired. If the sought-after information already was covered in the interview, simply say: “These key points were my major concerns and you already covered them. You’ve been very thorough. Thank you.”

Lastly, if you don’t get the job, have the courage to ask: “What were your main concerns about how I might fit this role?” The answer is invaluable and can be used to better yourself for a future interview. Happy job hunting!