Outside the ropes, looking in: defending pro wrestling

Finbarr Brennan

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I’ve been a die-hard fan of professional wrestling for the past 10 years. The main products that I watch are based in the US. However, there has been various Irish-based promotions started up on our soil over the past 15 years or so. One of  these promotions is Over The Top Wrestling or OTT. I have enjoyed many of their shows over the past year. Here’s some things that I took away from watching pro wrestlers do what they do:

  1. There’s real risk:

When you watch professional wrestling on TV, you don’t get the same sense of realism as you do when you watch it live. Its not until you see it right in front your face that you can see how much risk is actually involved. There are wrestlers who do flips and dives that, if done incorrectly, could result in serious injury (or possibly worse). Below is a compilation of some of these complex and dangerous moves.

2. Its very physical:

Many people don’t see wrestling as a sport as it is pre-determined. While it is true that it is pre-determined, the physicality of the wrestling isn’t faked at all. Pro wrestlers train just as hard as other professional athletes. Take a look at this video of a WWE tryout:

3. Its very intimate:

The likes of OTT and other independent shows don’t possess the power to put on big, arena-like spectacles like the WWE. Most of these independent shows are very intimate. The shows that I’ve been to have audiences of between 1000 people and 100 people. In relation to my other points, its very hard to “fake” wrestle when the audience is that close. Not to mention being physical and risk-free. Below is a wrestling show in Ireland called Fight Factory. You can see how intimate some of these shows can be.

This article is not written in order to convert those who shun wrestling. This article is written simply to defend the professional wrestling business. Everyone needs to understand what its all about. Hopefully this helps.

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Finbarr Brennan