On Demand Fireplaces? Now Available On Netflix

Stephen Allen

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , ,

The eternal Netflix loading screen. Photo Credit: John Pasden (Flickr)
The eternal Netflix loading screen. Photo Credit: John Pasden (Flickr)

The recent Netflix updates saw the usual string of releases being shoved onto the streaming service. You can now watch the insane nineties tribute “Turbo Kid” or “Look Who’s Back” starring a time-travelling Hitler.

However, the most bizarre update is the inclusion is this 4k video of a burning fireplace entitled: “Fireplace 4K : Crackling Birchwood from Fireplace for your Home”.

The main question I have, apart from whether there’s an oak variant, is: why does this have a five star rating?

As mentioned in a previous post, anything on Netflix is generally licensed to fill a perceived gap. Netflix is simply doing what it usually does; out-doing their competition.

You can bet that if there’s something on Netflix, there was definitely a demand for it. So, is there really that much of a demand for these kinds of videos?

The answer is, surprisingly, yes.

A Christmas Fireplace. Photo Credit: Pat Murphy (Flickr)
A Christmas Fireplace. Photo Credit: Pat Murphy (Flickr)

The substitution of regular fireplaces with these television versions aren’t just a random idea. The use of fireplaces has become less common in modern times with the television replacing it as the centrepiece of the living-room, for better or worse.

The entire generation seems to focus more towards renting than actually buying property, meaning the majority of people might not have a fireplace. It’s becoming that the inclusion of a fireplace is not a major selling point for a property.

Many streaming services are offering the fireplace as there seems to be more living spaces with a television or laptop.

A Fireplace. Photo credit: Riccardo Cuppini (Flickr)
A Fireplace. Photo credit: Riccardo Cuppini (Flickr)

Oddly enough, this isn’t really something new. It’s actually a popular in American tradition for Christmas Day. For the American television stations , especially WPIX, would broadcast an hour of a fireplace on Christmas Day called The Yule Log.

The history of this annual show is rather interesting. This tradition was initially discontinued in 1989 but the popularity of the annual programming led to a revival of it by WPIX in 2006, after strong demand after the 9/11 attacks.   After its revival, the show has spread to other areas,  including a Warner Brothers HD on demand version of the Yule Log.

The popularity of these fireplace programmes have spawned a good few spin-offs, including the five hours of Darth Vaders funeral pyre or ten hours of Nick Offerman.

So, this bizarrely popular Netflix video, that the creator, George Ford, told TDN that it four and a half years to film, might actually be a good thing for Netflix and the environment.

A lot of recent research into the environmental impact of wood burning fires have found that those fires produce a higher than expected pollution level and have a negative effect on your health. While the television might not be the most environmentally friendly device, it is still leagues above a wood fire.

These fireplaces are actually an eco friendly alternative Photo Credit: Bureau of Land Management (Flickr)
These fireplaces are actually an eco friendly alternative Photo Credit: Bureau of Land Management (Flickr)

So, while it may come across as a bizarre addition to the Netflix libray, there does seem to be plenty of use for this seemingly banal videos. Just remember, if your laptop is actually giving off a lot of heat, you should probably get that checked out because it certainly isn’t the video.

/ 10 Articles

Stephen Allen