The cronut, a mix between croissant and donut, emerged in 2013 in a New York bakery. It started a hype with people waiting for hours outside to get their hands on a cronut. Copies emerged around the globe, the London bakery branch of Dominique Ansel, the creator of the cronut, is selling a single pastry for 4.50₤. This is not stopping people from wanting it.

You could even make your own, but the process takes days to complete.

So of you crave a donut, it is much faster to buy one.

The place to go for all your cronut-cravings in Dublin is Krüst. Founded in 2012, the bakery has expanded to a catering service and is running its own small café on Georgia Street. Their signature item is the cronut.

Is it a donut? Is it a croissant? Even better, it’s both! The dough of a cronut is a modified type of croissant dough, the shape is that of a typical donut. At Krüst they come with a variety of toppings, here Glaze and M&M. Photo: Katharina Laumann

Now, to be honest, the cronut had a hard time, convincing me to even give it a try. I‘m from Germany, which is internationally known for its hearty cuisine (think Octoberfest, beer, meat, and potatoes). Much less known is the German tradition of afternoon coffee. The German name for this tradition Kaffee and Kuchen (coffee and cake) is indicative of what it’s all about.

As a result, bakeries are widespread throughout Germany. According to the DEHOGA, the German Hotel and Restaurant Union, there were 11.608 cafés in Germany in 2017. In contrast to this, the specialist magazine foodservice lists a total of 156 Starbucks and 185 Coffee Fellows stores for the same year.

So it can be said, that Germans are quite sceptical when it comes to coffee culture and pastries imported from the US. That’s why for me the cronut was just a weird franken-pastry. That is until I walked past Krüst’s shop window at some point in late 2018.

Since then I took six of my German friends who were visiting Dublin to Krüst to try the strange but glorious thing that is a cronut. It is now time for the verdict.

The location: Krüst is located on 6 South Great Georges Street, Dublin 2. The shop looks small, but there is a downstairs area with more seats. The café is cozy, with lots of wood, mixed cushions and a nice little corner bench. It is also worth noting that the café is accessible to wheelchair users.

Cafe:
Monday to Friday: 7.30am – 7pm
Weekends and Bank Holidays: 9am – 7pm

Wine Bar:
Tuesday to Saturday: 7pm – 11.30pm

Service: The people working the counter are always friendly. Hot drinks are prepared upon order and customers choose pastries from a large display.

The Food: During our visits, we tried seven different types of cronuts: Glazed, Cinnamon, Snickers, Browny, Raspberry, M&M, and Caramel. All of them were delicious. However, they are very sweetbakery.and if I could suggest an improvement, it would be for more versions with fruits.

From the top left: Brownie, Snickers and Raspberry cronuts with Matcha-Latte. Photo: Katharina Laumann

If you don‘t like sweet things, Krüst also offers a variety of sandwiches and salads.

Allergies: If you are allergic to gluten, this place is not for you (although, one of my friends who has a severe gluten intolerance said the cronut was worth the pain). For coffee-lovers dairy-free options are available.

Price: You can get a cronut and a hot drink for 6 €

If you want to go all out, you can also order catering and have a cronut party.

Overall Ranking: 9 out of 10 cronut crumbs.